Educational Bits on Dogs, Parrots, and Horses

Hello! I’ve been hard at work establishing my business here in Salt Lake City, so I haven’t had time to write an actual blog entry yet (one is on its way, though!). In the meantime, these are some interesting articles, videos, and research I’ve found over the past week:

Dogs

An oldie but a goodie: when people ask me about dominance theory in dogs, my favorite place to send them is AVSAB‘s Dominance Position Statement: http://avsabonline.org/uploads/position_statements/Dominance_Position_Statement_download-10-3-14.pdf

And to further refine our understanding of dog play behaviors, check out this article: http://thebark.com/content/your-dogs-rough-play-appropriate

 

Parrots

This is a fabulous video, not only because it shows an elegant solution to aggressive behaviors in parrots, but also because it shows that just because a bird currently dislikes one gender/hair color/skin color/whatever doesn’t mean they always have to. This myth of parrots intrinsically liking or disliking certain types of people or being a one person bird or whatever – with no hope of change or improvement because it’s *who they are* – is so prevalent. But those of us who use science-based training methods disprove it every day. Be sure to look in the top right corner of the video for the captions explaining what’s going on. They’re easy to miss if you don’t know they’re there.

 

And this is a fabulous video because I’ve heard many people say, “I don’t want to use a clicker (or any marker) and treats because then I have to always use them for the rest of my life.” Not so! And this video perfectly demonstrates that. When a behavior is proofed and fluent, the marker is no longer necessary, the reinforcers can (but don’t need to) wait until the end of the behavior chain, and they don’t always have to be food reinforcers. As with this bird, they can be praise and/or petting most of the time, with the occasional treat to keep the behavior fun and exciting.

 

Horses

And finally, this is a fascinating study discussing the causes of equine stereotypies such as cribbing. There’s a lot of confusion and misinformation about cribbing and how to address it, so I thought it was worth sharing.

Equine-stereotypic-behaviors-Causation-occurrence-and-prevention.

In other news, there will be some exciting additions to the FBTB website over the next few weeks. I’ll be adding an events page where I can announce upcoming classes and workshop, and I’m also going to add an FAQ page. Fun stuff!

 

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About Emily Strong

behavior consultant. veterinary technician. crazy parrot lady. lifelong animal lover. cellist. yogi. hula hooper. horse rider. swimmer. singer. reader. writer. dreamer. music lover. amateur gardener. nutrition enthusiast. eternal student. language lover. aspiring polyglot. tattoo canvas. water drinker. overthinker. bountiful laugher. overenthusiast. attention deficit meditator.
This entry was posted in Behavior, Birds, Dogs, Education, Horses, Uncategorized, Wellness and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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